Almost There

1 week and it’ll all be over (at least for another 2 months).

With our clinical exams out of the way all that is left are the written exams. How time has flown, fourth year of university is almost over, just another 3 years to go.

It’s been one hell of a year so I’m most likely going to write a review of this year after exams, so stay tuned for that.

Until then, One. Last. Push.

 

N.B: I am ignoring anything to do with the election on here, as important as it is, I’m not one to publicise my political views and beliefs unless asked.

Recap

3 weeks…3 weeks and it will be over and summer will be here.

Revision has sent everyone crazy, but what else would you expect. On top of revision is the rather ironic factor of applying for student finance and NHS bursaries for next year, because nothing says time well spent than not revising but instead preparing for next year.

Other than revision, not much is happening. I’m taking a bit of time out of revision to relax as well as going to see Guns n’ Roses which should be a great day out.

Now to go look for my motivation, pretty sure I left it round here somewhere

Eurgh…

Posts are getting further and further apart. I have 5 weeks until my finals and there’s too much revision required to be done. So you may have to bear with until exams are over.

As for last week, 3 exams, 2 essay deadlines and a portfolio deadline. It was a tough first week back which has meant this weekend is probably going to be one of the last off relaxing.

As for what else has been going on since the last post (which I believe was before cricket tour), I’ve sorted housing and finance for next year, which are the most challenging parts of the medical degree. Honestly, piss up in a brewery sort of incompetence.

Cricket tour was great fun (from what I remember) and a great time away before knuckling down for one last push.

I’m sure more posts will come during revision – ultimately as procrastination. Until then, Ciao

I’m Sorry

I think the title says it all really. To say I’ve neglected this blog slightly, on the plus side it means nothing *too* eventful is happening.

I’m currently off for Easter holidays, trying to rest and avoid doing anything to do with work or medicine, which is easier said than done. Thankfully the two essays are done and all that is let to do is revision for finals.

During the break I have been able to spend some time in neurosurgery, observing a couple of tumour resections. This was amazing and a speciality I would love to go in to, and not so strangely enough, this didn’t help to dampen my ideas about going into neurosurgery. By far the most amazing part of it was being able to visit the patients mere hours after they had their skull removed, brain moved and prodded and tumours removed, and find them sitting up in bed chatting and eating food.

That is one thing I do suggest to anyone wanting to experience a speciality that may be competitive or not a placement in med school is to be proactive and find consultants in those fields. I have learnt that they are more than happy (most of the time) to have students in.

Next week I am off on tour for a weekend and continuing revision so don’t expect anymore posts for a while.

And breathe

Firstly, apologies for the lack of posting over the last fortnight. It’s finally the Easter holiday’s and I needed to spend some time not doing anything *too* medically related before cracking on with essays and revision.

How I wish I was going on holiday but alas I remain at uni. Although at least when the weather is good I can relax in my garden (definitely didn’t get sunburnt last weekend).

In addition to this, I am also starting to actually sleep. That’s not to say life isn’t hectic and trying to throw things at me every 10 seconds but it’s a start. The other thing I’ve tried to do (although not always succeeding) is to try and relax. Thankfully, our university has free membership to a website called Headspace.

It’s basically a meditation app, which has a free 10 day trial before you even need to think about purchasing a membership (you can replay previous days if you want to stretch it out). Membership is expensive but definitely look into whether your university, college, school or workplace can sign up to its Get Some/Give Some program.

It may not help everyone and I’ve never really thought about trying it before, but it forces you to stop everything for 10 minutes, focus on de-stressing and letting go of those little annoyances which build up over the day. (This is not an ad, this is simply something I have used which I found helpful).

Now onto the Easter weekend. There’s 2 months until finals so I should probably get cracking on revision after this weekend, but until then, I’m relaxing regardless of what happens (said confidently glancing over a shoulder).

 

Offers, Waiting Lists and Rejections

It’s that time of year where most of the universities have finished their interview cycles and are sending out their results. Statistically, around 5% of GEM applicants and 20% of Undergrads will have offers.

If you have an offer, congratulations! You’ve made it through the dreaded cycle, now it’s time to get your DBS and contracts signed. Don’t delay on this, don’t give them a reason to reject you after you’ve come this far.

Step 2: Get your student finance application started. Even if you haven’t got all your offers you can change this before you submit it, but get the rest of the application sorted. If you’re a GEM offer holder, I suggest making a decision early as student finance hire temps you do not realise there is funding for GEM as a second degree. If it gets really troublesome, ask for Tier 2 – Graduate medicine department.

Step 3: Attend the open days. These are put on especially for offer and waiting list applicants where you get to judge the university instead of the other way round. You also get to meet your new potential course-mates and jaded medics from years above. There’s normally free food and workshops as well.

If you’ve been put on the waiting list, do not despair. Last year, every single GEM school used up every single place on their waiting lists. This actually extended beyond the waiting list with people getting called up for an offer during the first week of term. Similar to the offer holders, sort out student finance application (but don’t send it until you have the offer), attend the open days and keep an open mind. Make a back up plan for the next year if it happens that you don’t get an offer but make sure it’s not set in stone until you know for sure. It is hell, every single email from that uni will make you jump. I should know, I was one of the waiting list applicants. I ended up getting the offer while working in July (I was 19th/29 on the waiting list), so keep the hope.

If you’ve had the unfortunate situation of being rejected, it’s not the end of the world (cliche, I know). Take the rejection as a lesson, sometimes a uni just doesn’t feel you’re right for them, sometimes you had a bad day, sometimes you just happened to come up against the cream of the crop. Take a step back, think about your next move. Is medicine right for you? Do you want to apply again? What are you gonna do in the meantime? These are big questions but don’t rush to answer them all at once. If you’re a GEM applicant, you have the GAMSAT score for another year (if you did it) and it was obviously good enough to get interview this time so you’ll have a chance to get another the next year.

If you are going to apply again. Ask for the feedback from the interview. They won’t be able to give you the answers but they can send you the reasons why they didn’t accept you. Spend the next year working on that aspect, be it work experience, communication skills or just interview technique. Remember though, most medical schools only allow 2 interviews per applicant but there is infinite amounts of times you can apply (as long as you don’t exhaust the interview limits)

 

Regardless of your decision, I wish you all the best in your careers. Maybe one day we’ll cross paths but you’ll never know we did…

Exercise

Sometimes you need to exercise the body and not just the mind.

Today I ran a 5k!!!

It may not seem the most amazing thing but as someone who has torn both quadricep tendons and ankle ligaments and has struggled to maintain fitness and exercise (cricket is a great sport to play, but kind of rubbish when it’s only april to september), I’m very proud of what I achieved.

Hopefully this will be the start of a more regular exercise program, if my muscles can take it.

Now what to do for the rest of the weekend???